ParsonsxTeenVogue

Teen Vogue & Parsons School of Design: Understanding Fashion Production. Part 4

This is SUCH a cool course in the fashion certificate!!! Not only do you get exposed to new info about fashion production, but you get answers to questions you’ve been thinking of whenever you try on garments. Ok, so how many of you think they know their size in a specific brand, go buy a similar item without trying it on and then figure out that it’s a bit tight or a bit loose?!!! The answer to this mystery is right here in this post 😉

The days where I buy a few items blindly thinking that I’ve figured out my size(s) in pants, blouses, tops or even dresses from a specific brand are long gone. I’ve always wondered why can’t the factories of a brand get it right every time. I mean don’t they have specifications to work with? How hard is it to follow the measurements on paper? The answer is Standard Deviation. Although we’re relying on machinery to stitch garments up, these machines are still operated by humans and humans make errors!! Each designer adds an allowance within certain areas of the garment where an error might occur. These are usually a deviation of half an inch or one fourth of an inch, or one eighth of an inch. This is acceptable for mass market production, not in couture though as in high end collections, they are made to fit the client’s specific measurements.

In order to experience this, I went to a department store, picked several jeans that I liked from different brands in different sizes. In order to nail down the look and feel that I wanted from each brand, I found out that my size varied up to two inches in the waist for the pants. This variation was not only between different brands, but between different pants for the same brand. Hence, realizing that one of the many challenges faced by brands in the mass market category is fit and sizing.

Adios amigos, or till the next awesome assignment 😉

xoxo,

Dina

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