ParsonsxTeenVogue

Teen Vogue & Parsons School of Design: Understanding Fashion Production. Part 5

Hello again wonderful people ๐Ÿ™‚ How is your week going so far? Hope it’s been awesome!!! Today we’re going to talk about product mockups! yuppp!!! When I first read the assignment, I was freaking out a bit. I mean I was like ARE YOUR SERIOUS??!!! How can I create a mockup when I haven’t studied fashion before (this also applies to the next assignment of creating an actual product LOL!!!), so let’s see what happened.

Generally, designers create mockups because they act as a communication medium with the manufacturers in addition to helping the designers understand the production process, think and make decisions about suitable fabrics & materials, as well as estimate production costs, etc.

The “Mockup” assignment was as following:

1. Create a mockup of your “signature” bag. This could be a purse, a backpack, a messenger bag, etc.

2. The mockup should represent your visual style that has been established in one of the previously created mood boards.

3. Make use of previously found fabrics to create a production cost grid for the bag. This grid should include your proposed retail price.

So, how to tackle this project? First, I decided to create a mockup for a previously designed bag for one of the certificate modules. The bag design was couture style so it wasn’t easy to come up with a plan. I decided which colors, fabrics, and materials to use. I wanted the base of the bag to be pink leather, and the bag handle to be metal welded with colors. The main branch to be gold color and the flowers to be dark pink, blue and green. The butterflies would be colored as well. These are not the fabrics I chose for a previous mood board, since I was only thinking about dresses when I chose the fabrics and not bags. Another trip to the fabric store was inevitable to get the price for pink leather fabric, but I decided to delay this to the very end.

Next comes a visit to a local craft store. I picked up pink card stock paper with texture similar to the leather I imagined, colored flowers to add on top just to indicate where everything should go and decided to create the butterflies myself. I looked for gold card stock paper for the handle, but couldn’t find any so I decided to use the pink paper for the entire bag since it was just a mockup.

The assignment at this point was gonna take so much time, much more than the suggested 90 minutes so I needed to make decisions. First, I created a mockup of the bag using regular white paper. These pieces of paper would act as my pattern for the nice pink card stock paper and build my experience constructing a bag. I finally created the mockup for the bag using the pink card stock. I added the flowers, but creating the butterflies would have consumed so much time at this point so I stopped.

The final challenge is with the production cost grid. I had two problems; finding the cost of the materials (leather, metal sheets) and estimating the labor hours especially for the people who do metal welding.ย I went to two local fabric stores and they had no leather. ย I researched on Etsy to get a price estimate, but the fabrics weren’t what I had imagined, so I decided to get a production cost price estimate from an overseas designer I know in Egypt. I sent her pictures of my mockup and the materials I had in mind, asked her to give me an estimate if I were to use her workshop for producing my bag. The cost should include: (a) pink leather fabric, (b) stitching, (c) liner if needed, (d) metal sheets, and (e) labor costs. The estimated total production cost in Egypt is USD $450. Adding 20% profit would total to USD $540. The estimated retail price would be USD $600 using these materials.

I hope this sheds some light into what it takes to produce an accessory piece for you ๐Ÿ˜‰

P.S.* There is a tiny detail on the front of the bag design that is not present in the mockup!

Love,

Dina

 

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